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Science Museum Group

Interior of The Belle Vue Studio on Manningham Lane.

As the National Science and Media Museum unveils a new display, Interpretation Developer Charlotte Howard, explores the story of Bradford’s multicultural origins and how one photographic studio captured the moment.

Box labelled 'Dr White's Belt - adjustable, for comfort' with accompanying safety pins in a small plastic bag

American inventor Mary Kenner spent her life inventing objects that made everyday tasks easier for people. To mark her birthday, Assistant Curator Rebecca Raven explores her life and work, including the invention of the sanitary belt, which played an important but overlooked role in the development of menstrual products.

On Thursday 25 March, for the second event in the Open Talk series, the Science Museum Group was joined by an expert panel to explore issues around discriminatory technology and how we can create technology that truly works for everyone.

In celebration of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science on 11 February, Science Museum Group’s Director of Learning Susan Raikes outlines the importance of encouraging women and girls into careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) and highlights some of the many roles available.

To mark the start of Black History Month in the UK, Assistant Director & Head Curator Andrew McLean explores the legacy of Asquith Xavier, who successfully fought to become the first black worker employed as a train guard at London Euston station in 1966. This post is part of our Open for All series.

Curator of Art Collections Dr. Katy Barrett explores how working with artists in response to themes and objects in our collection can help to illuminate the role of science in our lives and identities. This post is part of our Open for All series.

A view inside Watt's Workshop at the Science Museum.

Head of Collections Tilly Blyth examines how the choices we make about what to research can help us to understand the role objects in our collection had in supporting colonial structures and the new roles the collection might play in creating spaces that are open for everyone.

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