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Science Museum Group

Coronavirus: what we know (and don’t know) about the virus

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-science-what-we-know-and-dont-know-about-the-virus
By Roger Highfield

…to treat: they’re hard to combat without also damaging the cells the virus has infected. What is a coronavirus? This pandemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute…

Testing for Coronavirus

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/testing-for-coronavirus
By Roger Highfield

Is testing for coronavirus important for curbing the pandemic? Critical. Until effective coronavirus vaccines or drugs are available, testing is a powerful way to monitor and manage the pandemic. ‘We…

Coronavirus: Ending the pandemic

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/ending-the-pandemic
By Roger Highfield

…patients already infected with the novel coronavirus will emerge more quickly than vaccines is that some tried-and-tested drugs already look promising as a result of a massive effort to screen…

Coronavirus: Exit strategies

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-exit-strategies
By Roger Highfield

…on a vaccine against another coronavirus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). ‘Preclinical data on several Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus vaccines shows them working in animal models, including the fact…

Coronavirus: the new normal

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-the-new-normal
By Roger Highfield

…We will continue to produce occasional in-depth blogs to keep you abreast of the latest coronavirus science. How does coronavirus spread? The SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for COVID-19 measures only 125…

Coronavirus: how the virus works

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-how-the-virus-works
By Roger Highfield

…image the virus. When we see the virus, we can instantly understand why the coronavirus gets its name – there’s a crown-like haze around the particles, which are spikes that…

Coronavirus: from antibodies to vaccines

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-from-antibodies-to-vaccines
By Roger Highfield

coronaviruses into host cells. This is according to their research on antibodies from the B cells of a person who was infected with the SARs coronavirus in 2003, which drew…

Coronavirus: The spike

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-the-spike
By Roger Highfield

…to looking at. When you use an electron microscope to image the virus – which measures 125 billionths of a metre across – you can see why the coronavirus gets…

Up close with coronavirus

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/up-close-with-coronavirus
By Roger Highfield

…in Hong Kong found coronavirus genetic material was present in aerosols. Almost half of coronavirus patients had the virus in exhaled breath which stays airborne, though they showed you could…

Coronavirus: brief history of viruses

https://www.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/blog/coronavirus-brief-history-of-viruses
By Roger Highfield

…viruses.’ Viruses can carry their genetic information in the form of the long chain-like chemical RNA (as in the case of the coronavirus), or DNA, and he said we don’t…